Archive for January, 2011

26
Jan
By Tasso Argyros in Analytic platform, Analytics, Database, MapReduce on January 26, 2011
   

When we kicked off Aster Data back in 2005, we envisioned building a product that would advance the state of the art in data management in two areas; (1) size and diversity of data and (2) depth of insight/analytics. My co-founders and I quickly realized that building just another database wouldn’t cut it. With yet-another-database, even if we enabled companies to more cost-effectively manage large data sizes, it was not going to be enough given the explosion in diverse data types and the massive need to process all of it. So we set out to build a new platform that would solve these challenges - what’s now commonly known as the ‘Big Data’ challenge.

Fast forward to 2008 when Aster Data led the way in putting massive parallel processing inside a MPP database, using MapReduce, to advance how you process massive amounts of diverse data. While this was fully aligned with our vision for managing hoards of diverse data and allowing deep data processing in a single platform, most thought it was intriguing but couldn’t quite see the light in terms of where the future was going. At one point, we thought of naming our product XAP – “extreme analytic platform” or “extreme analytic processing” as that’s what it was designed to do from day one. However, we thought better of it since we thought we would have to educate people too much on what an “analytic platform” was and how it was different from a traditional DBMS for data warehousing. Since we also were serving the data architects in organizations as well as the front-line business that demands better, faster analytics, we needed to use terminology that resonated with both.

Then, in the fall of 2009, with our flagship product Aster Data nCluster 4.0, we made further strides in running advanced analytics inside the database by including all the built-in application services (e.g. like dynamic WLM, backup, monitoring, etc) to go with it. At that time, we referred to it as a Data-Application Server - which our customers quickly started calling a Data-Analytics Server.  I remember when analyst Jim Kobielus at Forrester said,

“It’s really innovative and I don’t use those terms lightly. Moving application logic into the data warehousing environment is ‘a logical next step’.”

And others saying,

“The platform takes a different approach from traditional data warehouses, DBMS and data analytics solutions by housing data and applications together in one system, fully parallelizing both. This eradicates the need for movements of massive amounts of data and the problems with latency and restricted access that creates.”

What they started to fully appreciate and realize is that big data is not just about storing hoards of data, but rather, cracking the code on how to process all of it in deep ways, at blazing fast speeds. Read the rest of this entry »