Archive for March, 2012

21
Mar
   

The conversation around “big data” has been evolving beyond a technology discussion to focus on analytics and applications to the business.  As such, we’ve worked with our partners and customers to expand the scope of the Big Data Summit events we initiated back in 2009 and have created Big Analytics 2012 – a new series of roadshow events kicking off in San Francisco on April 19, 2012 .

According to previous attendees and market surveys, the greatest big data application opportunities in businesses are:

- Digital marketing applications such as multi-channel analytics and testing to better understand and engage your customers

- Using data science and analytics to explore and develop new markets or data-driven services

Companies like LinkedIn, Edmodo, eBay,  and others have effectively applied data science and analytics to take advantage of the new economics of data. And they are ready to share details of what they have learned along the way.

Big Analytics 2012 is a half-day event, is absolutely free to attend, and will include insight from industry insiders in two different tracks: Digital Marketing Optimization, and Data Science and Analytics. Big Analytics 2012 is a great way to meet and hear from your peers such as: executives who want to learn more about leveraging advanced analytics to a competitive advantage, interactive marketing innovators who want access to “game changing” insights for digital marketing optimization, enterprise architects and business intelligence professionals looking to provide big data infrastructure and data scientists and business analysts who are responsible for developing new data-driven products or business insights.

Come to learn from the panel of experts and stay for an evening networking reception that will put you in touch with big data and analytics professionals from throughout the industry. Big Analytics 2012 will be coming soon to a city near you. Click here to learn more about the event and to register now.

 



19
Mar
By Tasso Argyros in Analytics, Business analytics, Interactive marketing, Teradata Aster on March 19, 2012
   

Tomorrow, I will have the pleasure of presenting “Radical Loyalty – Data Science Applied to Marketing” at the GigaOm Structure:Data event with Marc Parrish, the VP of Membership and Customer Retention Marketing at Barnes & Noble. In contrast with most talks at this event, Marc and I will be focusing on the business opportunities of Big Data and specifically on marketing loyalty programs and how they relate to Big Data analytics.

The concept of a loyalty program is certainly nothing new. Brick and mortar companies have been leveraging customer loyalty in a variety of unique ways for decades. What’s different is the ability of businesses to use new types of data to take their customer loyalty insights and strategies to a completely new level. At tomorrow’s conference, we will explore ways in which modern retailers like Barnes & Noble with a strong digital marketing strategy leverage their customers’ loyalty using Big Data and how to make loyalty programs worthwhile for customers and their needs.

Barnes & Noble has proven an ability to innovate their business model by leveraging data. I look forward to sharing some insight with Marc on retail and other real world applications of Big Data.



15
Mar
By Steve Wooledge in Analytics, MapReduce, Teradata Aster on March 15, 2012
   

Yesterday I presented at the Los Angeles Teradata User Group on the topic of “Data Science: Finding Patterns in Your Data More Quickly & Easily with MapReduce”. One point discussed was the common misnomer that big data is about volume, which is certainly part of the issue organizations are facing. However, the big story in big data is the complexity and additional processing required to make “unstructured” data actionable through analytics. This is where procedural frameworks like MapReduce can help. Here is a great post by Teradata’s own Bill Franks about unstructured data which helps describe the requirements unstructured data demands in the context of analytics.

As Franks notes, “the thought of using unstructured data really shouldn’t intimidate people as much as it often does.” Read more to learn why.