Archive for April, 2012

26
Apr
By Paul Barrett in Digital Marketing, Social Media, Teradata Aster on April 26, 2012
   

What questions are important to you about Social Media?

John Lovett from Web Analytics Demystified just published a new white paper on Social Analytics. Lovett, who has written the book on Social Analytics (literally), lays out a compelling vision for Deeper Social Analytics for companies.  He clearly presents the value of companies to go beyond surface level analytics of likes, followers and friends and challenges the CMO to ask deeper and more important questions.

I love the three key questions presented in the paper that really hit the c-suite.  These are

  • What is the Audience?
  • What is the Activity?
  • What is the Action?

These 3 questions provide a framework to share social media initiatives with business leaders and strip away all the non-business related questions that become so distracting in understanding the impact of social media on the enterprise.

Although we are still in the early, Black and White TV stage of social analytics, Teradata Aster has been heavily influenced by our customers’ needs in the social space.  Customers like LinkedIn,  Gilt Groupe, MySpace, and Myzinga have redefined how consumers interact with each other through music, shopping, and content.  Attensity running on Aster promises to bring together big data and social analytics that starts to deliver on Mr. Lovett’s proposition of deeper social analytics.

Teradata’s strategy to marry big data analytics and marketing applications with its industry-leading database solutions is steeped with the concept of deeper analytics.  In social analytics, we have identified 10 key business questions that should be asked about every social post.   In a market where posts can go viral, impact brand, customer perception, and revenue, being able to quickly and effectively navigate deeper social analytics becomes a mission critical capability.

Beyond John’s questions, the 10 key questions are:

  • What was said?
  • What is it about? (ie,  product, service, brand, experience)
  • Is it a common sentiment?
  • What are the trends on this topic?
  • Who said it?
  • What is their value?
  • How engaged are they?
  • What is their influence?
  • How do I respond?
  • Was my response effective?

To effectively answer these questions CMO’s need a set of marketing technologies.  These include:

  • A social listening platform that analyzes social timelines for owned, embassy and public feeds.  These tools identify what was said, what it is about and if it is a common sentiment.
  • The second level demands a customer hub to understand who posting and what the customer relationship is with them and to measure the customer value of that relationship.
  • The third level requires social network analytics and the ability to find implicit and explicit social connections.  This helps illuminate how engaged customers are and their level of influence – or who influences them
  • The fourth level is where integrated marketing management and customer facing marketing applications come it.  Once you understand what was said, who said it and the potential impact – how do you respond?  Is it a one-on-one conversation, a social discussion or was a bigger issue identified that may result in marketing campaigns?

Are these the right business questions to ask?  What else do you want to know about social media posts in your business?



13
Apr
By Mayank Bawa in Analytics, Business analytics, Teradata Aster on April 13, 2012
   

We live in interesting times!

In the past 30 years, data was used to record business events and report on business events. Over the last 5 years, data has gotten closer to business. Now data is being used to record business events, report on business events as well as influence business events. We now realize that the more data we record, the more comprehensively data can influence business events.

Hence the excitement of “big data” – it is a business opportunity for each line of business – to influence business events to have favorable outcomes.

The responsibility for technologists is to provide the right platforms and tools to make influencing business easy and simple.

There are TWO relentless forces that are playing out in the big data space to which technology has to respond.

The first force is the diversity of data. As we record more data, we end up having different formats of data to manage. About 20% is relational, but we also have text, emails, PDF, Twitter feeds, Facebook profiles, social graphs, CDRs, Apache logs, JSON formats, …

The second force is the richness of analytics. As we influence more business, we end up having richer analytics to perform. About 20% is SQL, but we also have time series analysis, statistical analysis, geo-spatial analysis, graph analysis, sentiment analysis, entity extraction, …

Note that I am not saying MapReduce doesn’t have a diverse set of analytics to do: MapReduce is a way of programming to do analysis – time series, statistical, geo-spatial – each require different MapReduce programs to be written.

Today, the platforms and tools for big data are very complex. They expect lines of business owners to write programs to manage different forms of big data, to write sophisticated programs to analyze big data, to master the management and administration of big clusters and be self-sustaining in managing data quality. This last point is very important – data values change over time. We have to keep values consistent, otherwise our analysis will be wrong and our influence on business will be negative – garbage in, garbage out rule of computing.

As a result, big data is in danger of entering the DIY (do it yourself) space. A line of business is now expected to support big clusters = big administration = big programs = big friction = low influence.

We have to acknowledge these challenges as technologists. If we let big data solutions be a DIY solution, only pockets of enterprise will embrace big data – the rest of the non-technology savvy business leaders will be left out of the opportunity.

We have to simplify this equation. We need to enable line of business owners to benefit from big data a lot more easily. We have to make it simpler for business leaders to get from big data to big analytics.

Our goal, big data = small clusters = easy administration = big analytics = big influence.

This entails solving the following problems:

[1] Make platform and tools to be easier to use to manage and curate data. Otherwise, garbage in = garbage out, and you will get garbage analytics.

[2] Provide rich analytics functions out of the box. Each line of programming cuts your reachable audience by 50%.

[3] Provide tools to update or delete data. Otherwise, data consistency will drift away from truth as history accumulates.

[4] Provide applications to leverage data and find answers relevant to business. Otherwise the cost of DIY applications is too high to influence business – and won’t be done.

At Teradata Aster, we are continuing to lead the big data revolution. We have led the revolution for the past 5 years, and helped shape the market and technologies. We are convinced that the path to big data success is to connect it with Big Analytics in the coming 5 years.