26
Nov
   

Speaking of ending things on a high note, New York City on December 6th will play host to the final event in the Big Analytics 2013 Roadshow series. Big Analytics 2013 New York is taking place at the Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers in the heart of Midtown on bustling 7th Avenue.

As we reflect on the illustrious journey of the Big Analytics 2013 Roadshow, kicking off in San Francisco, this year the Roadshow traveled through major international destinations including Atlanta, Dallas, Beijing, Tokyo, London and finally culminating at the Big Apple – it truly capsulated the appetite today for collecting, processing, understanding and analyzing data.

Big Analytics Atlanta 2013 photo

Big Analytics Roadshow 2013 stops in Atlanta

Drawing business & technical audiences across the globe, the roadshow afforded the attendees an opportunity to learn more about the convergence of technologies and methods like data science, digital marketing, data warehousing, Hadoop, and discovery platforms. Going beyond the “big data” hype, the event offered learning opportunities on how technologies and ideas combine to drive real business innovation. Our unyielding focus on results from data is truly what made the events so successful.

Continuing on with the rich lineage of delivering quality Big Data information, the New York event promises to pack tremendous amount of Big Data learning & education. The keynotes for the event include such industry luminaries as Dan Vesset, Program VP of Business Analytics at IDC, Tasso Argyros, Senior VP of Big Data at Teradata & Peter Lee, Senior VP of Tibco Software.

Photo of the Teradata Aster team in Dallas

Teradata team at the Dallas Big Analytics Roadshow

The keynotes will be followed by three tracks around Big Data Architecture, Data Science & Discovery & Data Driven Marketing. Each of these tracks will feature industry luminaries like Richard Winter of WinterCorp, John O’Brien of Radiant Advisors & John Lovett of Web Analytics Demystified. They will be joined by vendor presentations from Shaun Connolly of Hortonworks, Todd Talkington of Tableau & Brian Dirking of Alteryx.

As with every Big Analytics event, it presents an exciting opportunity to hear first hand from leading organizations like Comcast, Gilt Groupe & Meredith Corporation on how they are using Big Data Analytics & Discovery to deliver tremendous business value.

In summary, the event promises to be nothing less than the Oscars of Big Data and will bring together the who’s who of the Big Data industry. So, mark your calendars, pack your bags and get ready to attend the biggest Big Data event of the year.



15
Apr
   

About one year ago, Teradata Aster launched a powerful new way of integrating a database with Hadoop. With Aster SQL-H™, users of the Teradata Aster Discovery Platform got the ability to issue SQL and SQL-MapReduce® queries directly on Hadoop data as if that data had been in Aster all along. This level of simplicity and performance was unprecedented, and it enabled BI & SQL analysts that knew nothing about Hadoop to access Hadoop data and discover new information through Teradata Aster.

This innovation was not a one-off. Teradata has put forward the most complete vision for a data and analytics architecture in the 21st century. We call that the Unified Data Architecture™. The UDA combines Teradata, Teradata Aster & Hadoop into a best-of-breed, tightly integrated ecosystem of workload-specific platforms that provide customers the most powerful and cost-effective environment for their analytical needs. With Aster SQL-H™, Teradata provided a level of software integration between Aster & Hadoop that was, and still is, unchallenged in the industry.

Teradata Unified Data Architecture™ image

Teradata Unified Data Architecture™

Today, Teradata makes another leap in making its Unified Data Architecture™ vision a reality. We are announcing SQL-H™ for Teradata, bringing the best SQL engine for data warehousing and analytics to Hadoop. From now on, Enterprises that use Hadoop to store large amounts of data will be able to utilize Teradata’s analytics and data warehousing capabilities to directly query Hadoop data securely through ANSI standard SQL and BI tools by leveraging the open source Hortonworks HCatalog project. This is fundamentally the best and tightest integration between a data warehouse engine and Hadoop that exists in the market today. Let me explain why.

It is interesting to consider Teradata’s approach versus alternatives. If one wants to execute SQL on Hadoop, with the intent of building Data Warehouses out of Hadoop data, there are not many realistic options. Most databases have a very poor integration with Hadoop, and require Hadoop experts to manage the overall system – not a viable option for most Enterprises due to cost. SQL-H™ removes this requirement for Teradata/Hadoop deployments. Another “option” are the SQL-on-Hadoop tools that have started to emerge; but unfortunately, there are about a decade away from becoming sufficiently mature to handle true Data Warehousing workloads. Finally, the approach of taking a database and shoving it inside Hadoop has significant issues since it suffers from the worst of both worlds – Hadoop activity has to be limited so that it doesn’t disrupt the database, data is duplicated between HDFS and the database store, and performance of the database is less compared to a stand–alone version.

In contrast, a Teradata/Hadoop deployment with SQL-H™ offers the best of both worlds: unprecedented performance and reliability in the Teradata layer; seamless BI & SQL access to Hadoop data via SQL-H™; and it frees up Hadoop to perform data processing tasks at full efficiency.

Teradata is committed to being the strategic advisor of the Enterprise when it comes to Data Warehousing and Big Data. Through its Unified Data Architecture™ and today’s announcement on Teradata SQL-H™, it provides even more performance, flexibility and cost-effective options to Enterprises eager to use data as a competitive advantage.



25
Jan
   

Last month in New York we completed the 4th and final event in the Big Analytics 2012 roadshow. This series of events shared ideas on practical ways to address the big data challenge in organizations and change the conversation from “technology” to “business value”. In New York alone, 500 people attended from across both business and IT and we closed out the event with two speaker panels. The data science panel was, in my opinion, one of the most engaging and interesting panels I’ve ever seen at an event like this. The topic was on whether organizations really need a data scientist (and what’s different about the skill set from other analytic professionals). Mike Gualtieri from Forrester Research did a great job leading & prodding the discussion.

Overall, these events were a great way to learn and network. The events had great speakers from cutting-edge companies, universities, and industry thought-leaders including LinkedIn, DJ Patil, Barnes & Noble, Razorfish, Gilt Groupe, eBay, Mike Gualtieri from Forrester Research, Wayne Eckerson, and Mohan Sawhney from Kellogg School of Management.

As an aside, I’ve long observed that there has been a historic disconnect between marketing groups and the IT organizations and data warehouses that they support. I noticed this first when I worked at Business Objects where very few reporting applications ever included Web clickstream data. The marketing department always used a separate tool or application like Web Side Story (now part of Adobe) to handle this. There is a bridge being built to connect these worlds – both in terms of technology which can handle web clickstream and other customer interactional data, but also new analytic techniques which make it easier for marketing/business analysts to understand their customers more intimately and better serve them a relevant experience.

We ran a survey at the events, and I wanted to share some top takeaways. The events were split into business and technical tracks with themes of “data science” and “digital marketing”. Thus, the survey data compares the responses from those who were more interested in technology than the business content, so we can compare their responses. The survey data includes responses from 507 people in San Francisco, 322 in Boston, 441 in Chicago, and 894 in New York City for a total of 2164 respondents.

You can get the full set of graphs here, but here are a couple of my own observations / conclusions in looking at the data:

1)      “Who is talking about big data analytics in your organization?” – IT and Marketing were by far the largest responses with nearly 60% of IT organizations and 43% of marketing departments talking about it. New York had slightly higher # of CIO’s and CEO’s talking about big data at 23 and 21%, respectively

 Survey Data: Figure 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2)      “Where is big data analytics in your company” – Across all cities, “customer interactions in Web/social/mobile” was 62% – the biggest area of big data analytics. With all the hype around machine/sensor data, it was surprisingly only being discussed in 20% of organizations. Since web servers and mobile devices are machines, it would have been interesting to see how the “machine generated data” responses would have been if we had taken the more specific example of customer interactions away

 Survey Data: Figure 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3)      This chart is a more detailed breakdown of the areas where big data analytics is found, broken down by city. NYC has a few more “other.” Some of the “other” answers in NYC included:

  1. Claims
  2. Client Data Cloud
  3. Development, and Data Center Systems
  4. Customer Solutions
  5. Data Protection
  6. Education
  7. Financial Transaction
  8. Healthcare data
  9. Investment Research
  10. Market Data
  11.  Predictive Analytics (sales and servicing)
  12. Research
  13. Risk management /analytics
  14. Security

 Survey Data: Figure 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4)      “What are the Greatest Big Analytics Application Opportunities for Businesses Today? – on average, general “data discovery or data science” was highest at 72%, with “digital marketing optimization” as second with just under 60% of respondents. In New York, “fraud detection and prevention” at 39% was slightly higher than in other cities, perhaps tied to the # of financial institutions in attendance

 Survey Data: Figure 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In summary, there are lots of applications for big data analytics, but having a discovery platform which supports iterative exploration of ALL types of data and can support both business/marketing analysts as well as savvy data scientists is important. The divide between business groups like marketing and IT are closing. Marketers are more technically savvy and the most demanding for analytic solutions which can harness the deluge of customer interaction data. They need to partner closely with IT to architect the right solutions which tackle “big analytics” and provide the right toolsets to give the self-service access to this information without always requiring developer or IT support.

We are planning to sponsor the Big Analytics roadshow again in 2013 and take it international, as well. If you attended the event and have feedback or requests for topics, please let us know. I hear that there will be a “call for papers” going out soon. You can view the speaker bios & presentations from the Big Analytics 2012 events for ideas.



17
Oct
   

“Big data” has always been a favorite subject of discussion among the Aster Data team. We’ve been talking about big data at least since 2009, long before the term became burning-hot. The big data hype has confused many organization (and vendors) in the market about the best technology or method to solve their analytical business problems.

However, our vision hasn’t changed: from the time we founded the company in 2005 to today where we are part of the Teradata family. Teradata Aster continues to lead the market with technology innovations and reference architectures which provide clear guidance and deliver significant business value to our customers

Today, we are pushing the limits of analytical technology once more, by launching the Teradata Aster Big Analytics Appliance. The Big Analytics Appliance is a unique machine that can help enterprises see their business in high-definition. By harnessing all existing and new data types in the enterprise, we enable organizations to leverage our powerful SQL-MapReduce framework and business-ready analytics & apps which solve specifics business problems in marketing attribution, fraud detection, graph analysis, pattern analysis, and much more. It unleashes the creativity of bright analysts to go discover new insights to help their organizations grow revenue and create sustainable competitive advantage.

So what is the Big Analytics Appliance? It’s five things in one box:

  1. Aster + Apache Hadoop (100% open source via the Hortonworks HDP distribution), fully integrated in one box
  2. ANSI-standard SQL and next-generation MapReduce, fully integrated
  3. More than 50 ready-to-use MapReduce  apps, to deliver immediate business value
  4. Full ecosystem connectivity for both Aster and Hadoop; with BI, ETL and other existing IT systems
  5. The latest-generation, most efficient hardware platform, specifically optimized for Aster, Hadoop, and Big Analytics

Loyal to our Stanford roots, the appliance comes in Cardinal-red color!

Teradata Aster Big Analytics Appliance

The Big Analytics Appliance packs a long list of essential and unique technologies, including:

  • SQL-MapReduce®,  industry’s only true SQL/MapReduce integration
  • SQL-H™, industry’s only ANSI-standard SQL and Hadoop integration
  • Teradata Viewpoint, the most advanced database monitoring platform now extended to Aster and Hadoop
  • Teradata TVI a very sophisticated hardware support and failure prevention software, now ported to Hadoop as well as to Aster
  • Infiniband network interconnect – makes ultra-high-performance connectivity between Aster and Hadoop, as well as scalability, a non-issue
  • Small factor disk drives and dense enclosures – make this appliance one of the most dense and space-efficient big data platforms in the market

And, of course, everything in this appliance is packaged, integrated, pre-tested and supported by Teradata – the most trusted brand in data management and analytics.

I also want to take a moment to talk about our Unified Data Architecture vision for the enterprise. When most vendors out there talk about big data at a very high level without explaining where it fits and how it relates with traditional technologies like data warehousing, we decided to do the hard work of figuring out how different technologies complement each other and for what purpose. The result of that was the diagram below that showcases how Teradata, Aster & Hadoop can work together in tandem to provide a complete data solution for enterprise environments:

Teradata Unified Data Architecture

We also went one step further and now have a matrix that explains what technology (or technologies) are more appropriate for what use case – given a workload/use case and a specific type of data. The result of that exercise is below:

Processing as a Function of Schema Requirements by Data Type

When To Use Which Technology? The best approach by workload and data type

If you want to know more about our Unified Data Architecture vision, read the whitepaper we co-authored with Hortonworks, or feel free to contact us and we’ll be happy to discuss with you this concept and how it’d fit into your environment.

Through tightly integrating Aster and Hadoop, the new Big Analytics Appliance addresses a large part of the Unified Data Architecture; and via the Teradata-Aster and Teradata-Hadoop connectors, Teradata now has all the necessary pieces to help enterprises extract the maximum business value from all their data and execute on their Big Data vision. At Aster, just like at Teradata, we are committed to continuously provide the best innovations to help our customers have the power to make the best decision possible.

P.S. If you want to try out Aster without ordering a full Aster box, we now allow you to download an Aster virtual appliance! Go give it a try: http://www.asterdata.com/AsterExpress